Epsom Salt Bath for Dogs’ Wounds

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Dogs can be like kids at times, and as such they are bound to suffer from wounds and the occasional unexplained swelling. Try treating these ailments with Epsom salt soaks and heat packs next time. A bath consisting of Epsom salt and warm water can help reduce the swelling and the healing time, especially when combined with prescribed antibiotics and veterinary supervision. Be sure that your pet does not ingest Epsom salt, however, as it can be very harmful. Also, do not bathe your pet in Epsom salt if there are open wounds.

If soaking your dog in an Epsom salt bath twice a day for five minutes isn’t convenient or practical, a homemade heat pack using a clean towel drenched in the same warm-water solution can be applied to wounds for the same effect.

How to Travel with a Cat

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The very first rule of traveling with your cat is to have an ID tag or other means of identification securely affixed to the kitty. Thousands of dogs and cats end up in shelters simply because the owners never dreamed the pet would get loose or become lost while on a trip. There are few disasters in a person’s life that are worse than having to drive off without a pet because all means of locating and recovery have failed.  This kind of tragedy will haunt you for the rest of your life; don’t let it happen. Get an ID tag, or at the very least microchip your cat!

Before you leave make sure you consider the option of leaving your cat in a hometown boarding facility  Many are just for cats and do not board dogs. Others have the cats well away from any sight, sound or smell of a canine. In fact, go and visit your local boarding facility and see what goes on there. Continue reading

8 Tips For Caring For Your Pet This Winter

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1. In or Out?

Does your pet spend most of the time in the backyard? You might want to keep her indoors during the freezing months, especially if you live in bitterly cold areas. No one wants an icicle for a pet — they’re simply not that cuddly.

2. Bare Naked Truth

If you must keep your pet outdoors, consider this: Would a fur coat alone (even if it is faux mink) keep you warm against the elements? No? Well, your pet’s fur coat isn’t enough protection for your pet during winter, either. Be a pal and provide your dog with a warm, dry, and draft free shelter outside; the shelter should also comply with any state laws that apply.

3. No More Frozen Dinners!

Because it takes more energy to stay warm when it’s cold, outdoor animals eat more during the winter. Likewise, fresh, running water is vital for maintaining your pet’s health. Keep an eye on the water bowls and make sure they haven’t turned into little skating rinks for fleas (boo, fleas!). While ice pops might be a fun treat, your pet really doesn’t want to have to lick a frozen lump of ice to get his water. Continue reading

Flea Allergy in Dogs

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Flea allergy is one of the most common conditions afflicting dogs today, and one of four main types of allergies typically found in dogs. We’ve already detailed the signs and treatments of environmental allergies, but now we’re talking fleas.

The symptoms of flea allergy are similar to environment allergies:

  • Licking
  • Biting
  • Chewing
  • Scratching

But the biggest distinguishing factor between environmental allergies and flea allergies is the location and distribution of the itching.

“The majority of lesions are focused on their tail base or on the back of their legs,” Dr. Eckholm says. “Also, any time there is a presence of flea dirt, it’s going to point you in that direction.”

So what exactly is flea dirt and how do you spot it? Continue reading